CaSE responds to the 20178 A-level results, highlighting the importance of diversity in driving growth in the UK

Responding to today's A-level results across England, Northern Ireland and Wales, Naomi Weir, CaSE Deputy Director, said: 

“Congratulations to all students receiving their results today. It’s great to see many choosing to take STEM subjects and in particular to see the continued increase in uptake of computing. Uptake in some subjects remains very unequal, and computing is the least diverse of all subjects with females accounting for only 11.8% of entrants. 

As technology continues to shape the jobs of the future and as the number of routes for further study, training and work for young people grows, there must be sufficient advice and guidance to inform their choices pre and post-18. Otherwise the least advantaged and individuals from underrepresented groups will be poorly served. 

To support diversity and inclusion for all and to invest in the UK’s future, we’ve called on Government to get serious about supporting careers provision in schools and colleges. Last year's careers strategy makes a start, but depends on additional work by already stretched teachers and schools. If it’s to deliver for young people and for the UK, careers provision must be backed with funding and sustained support.”

ENDS    

NOTES

  1. See today's CaSE Comment piece for further breakdown of figures and graphs (for replication with CaSE reference and link to original)
  2. See our Diversity Policy Review (2018) for background and recommendations to improve diversity and inclusion in STEM
  3. Summary of figures from JCQ GCE A-level figures
    • Rise in number of Chemistry & Biology popularity due to increase in female participants (Boys taking these dropped from 2017)
    • Numbers of females in Computing, Maths & Physics also rose but to a smaller extent
    • 41% of all exams taken were in STEM subjects (increasing slightly from 40.7% last year)
    • Overall in STEM subjects, 48.7% were taken by females. This compares to 55.2% across all subjects
    • Of all exams sat by females, 36.4% were in a STEM subject (35.6% last year)
    • Computing entries rose by 23% this year, but still the least diverse of all the subjects (11.8% were female)
    • Attainment of A* - C increased for Physics, Maths & Computing, but decreased for Biology and Chemistry (none of these numbers are very significant)

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