CaSE has published a short briefing summarising the strong evidence for the value of public investment in science and engineering.

The evidence in this new two-page briefing, Why Champion Science and Engineering, shows that public investment supports a strong economy, creates high-value jobs, and helps us all live healthier and happier lives.

Over the next five years there is enormous opportunity for science and engineering to drive economic prosperity and public wellbeing as a central feature of the Government’s long-term economic plan.

Commenting on the briefing, CaSE Acting Director, Naomi Weir, said:

“Calling on the government to increase investment in science isn’t wishful thinking or special pleading, its good economic sense. The evidence shows that investment in R&D boosts growth and productivity, without which, the Government’s commitment to eliminating the deficit could turn out to be a costly broken promise.”

To realise these benefits, the Government must reverse the current downward trend and set out an ambitious upward trajectory for investment in science over the long-term. This would send a powerful signal of intent to high quality businesses around the world. It would help to make our country an even more attractive destination for private sector R&D investment, creating a virtuous circle of investment in science & engineering and bringing wide reaching benefits across the UK.

Naomi Weir, said:

“Of course the beauty of a thriving science and engineering sector isn’t confined to its contribution to the balance sheet of UK plc. From life-saving discoveries and culture-changing technology to expanding the boundaries of knowledge, our lives are richer, in every sense, thanks to science and engineering. The UK government is guardian of one of the most high-performing and successful science bases in the world. CaSE wants to see this Government investing in and developing this national asset well into the future.”

CaSE has shared the briefing with parliamentarians, peers and government, along with a booklet of ten actions that could be taken to strengthen science and engineering in the UK.

This briefing was produced with the generous support of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

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